Javascript Menu by Deluxe-Menu.com

Course 5T - Quiz 6

 

IMPORTANT — THIS QUIZ IS ONLY FOR VIEWING AND PRINTING ONLY.
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO TAKE YOUR QUIZ ON THIS PAGE.
RETURN TO YOUR HOME PAGE TO TAKE THE QUIZ.

Note: If you have a printer, you are welcome to print out this quiz.

 
1)
MOVING TO Part 6, 'Sibling Death and Childhood Traumatic Grief': This section focuses upon specific parental actions that can assist, or can further complicate, the reactions of surviving siblings with Childhood Traumatic Grief, following the death of a sibling. This material makes specific recommendations which counselors can share with the parents.

Parents typically make efforts to ease the grief of the surviving sibling, but some of their actions can worsen the child's traumatic grief. Which of the actions below would likely be most helpful to the surviving child in working through his or her grief?
 
Parents or caregivers can put away or hide all physical reminders of the child who died, including belongings, photos, etc.
Parents or caregivers can leave the deceased child's belongings untouched, leaving things exactly as they were prior to the death.
Parents can include the surviving sibling(s) in some of the decision making about which physical reminders of the deceased child to keep visible in the home.
 
2)
Some signs that a surviving sibling may be experiencing a Traumatic Grief reaction to a sibling's death may include
 
avoiding reminders of the deceased sibling
feeling helpless or vulnerable and afraid
feeling responsible for the death, or being overly cautious and overly protective of family members
associating previously benign physical ailments with death, e.g., becoming frightened or panicked by a headache or stomach ache.
All of the above.
 
3)
Children rarely contemplate or commit suicide after the death of a sibling, and therefore parents should not be concerned if the surviving child expresses thoughts about suicide or becomes extremely withdrawn or isolated.
 
True False
 
4)
If the surviving child shows recurring feelings of responsibility and guilt about the death of the sibling, the parent can help through __________________.
 
reassuring the child that the death was not their fault, and that circumstances at the time did not make it possible for the surviving child to prevent the sibling's death.
encouraging the child to return to their regular, life-affirming activities for social support.
being alert for signs that the child is becoming isolated and withdrawn.
All of the above.
None of the above
 
5)
Because thoughts about the deceased sibling can be disturbing to the surviving child, parents should avoid concrete explanations about what caused the death until signs of Traumatic Grief have passed.
 
True False
 
6)
Re sibling identity: The death of a child often leads to changes in the structure of the family and in the roles of the surviving siblings. Encouraging the surviving child to assume the role that the deceased sibling had played in the family (e.g., 'parental stand-in' or 'pet expert' or 'details manager') will provide comfort to the surviving child.
 
True False
 
7)
A parent can help to prepare the surviving siblings for difficult questions from outsiders, by helping them to develop and practice responses that feel comfortable.
 
True False
 
8)
'Straight from the Siblings - Another Look at the Rainbow' is a RESOURCE for surviving siblings that contains quotes and stories by bereaved siblings which describe not only the sadness but also the difficult feelings such as jealousy and guilt. It is written by ____. [Available on Amazon.com]
 
Davies, B.
Blanford, C.
Ruiz, R.A.
Jampolsky, G.G. (Ed.)
Jackson, Aariane
 

 

All content on this site is Copyright (c) 2006-2020 by Pendragon Associates and/or CEU by Net

Web Analytics